Spanish-Language Essay Topics

Course Description

Description

This course provides a unique approach to developing Spanish composition skills by focusing on descriptive, narrative, persuasive, informational, and comparative paragraph writing. High interest reading materials serve as the foundation for engaging discussions and compositional analysis. To prepare the student for advanced coursework, the course also includes grammar, usage, punctuation, vocabulary, and spelling. Students will become better writers, both in the classroom and in real-life situations.

Once students have successfully completed this course, they should develop:

  • Advanced writing proficiency in Spanish in a variety of formats.
  • The ability to follow a process approach to writing that covers description, narration, comparison, persuasion, and giving information.
  • Advanced proficiency in descriptive, narrative, comparative, persuasive, and informative writing.
  • Advanced knowledge of Spanish grammar.
  • Advanced proficiency in reading Spanish in order to become a better writer.
  • Knowledge of advanced spelling and punctuation rules in Spanish.
  • The ability to discuss reading topics and express opinions.

Materials Required

A microphone and headphones are required for this course.

Although a Spanish-English dictionary is not required, it may be useful as a personal reference for the duration of this course.

Detailed Course Information

Course Details

The following topics will be covered in the course:

  • Writing a fluid and transitional paragraph
  • Analyzing, discussing, and writing the Descriptive Essay
  • Analyzing discussing and writing the Narrative Essay
  • Analyzing, discussing, and writing the Comparative Essay
  • Analyzing, discussing, and writing the Persuasive Essay
  • Analyzing, discussing, and writing the Informative Essay
  • Description of Places and Weather
  • Description of People’s Emotional Attributes
  • Description of People’s Disposition

Technical Requirements

This course requires a properly maintained computer with high-speed internet access and an up-to-date web browser (such as Chrome or Firefox). The student must be able to communicate with the instructor via email. Visit the Technical Requirements and Support page for more details.

This course uses an online virtual classroom for discussions with the instructor. The classroom works on standard computers with the Adobe Connect Add-in or Adobe Flash plugin, and also tablets or handhelds that support the Adobe Connect Mobile app. Students who are unable to attend live sessions will need a computer with the Adobe Connect Add-in or Adobe Flash plugin installed to watch recorded meetings. The Adobe Connect Add-in, Adobe Flash plugin, and Adobe Connect Mobile app are available for free download. Students who do not have the Flash plug-in installed or enabled on their browsers will be prompted to download and install the Adobe Connect add-in when accessing the virtual classroom.

Most course lectures may be viewed on mobile devices, but in some cases assignments and quizzes must be completed on a desktop or laptop computer.

If you live in the United States, you must have rarely or even never thought about studying foreign languages. Indeed, why would you? English is spoken in both Americas (mostly), Europe, Slavic countries, and even India; only China, Japan, and some other far east countries have problems with the English language. However, being able to speak a foreign language—at least one—nowadays is becoming a necessity. Spanish, among all other foreign languages, seems to be the most necessary for the United States, and every U.S. student should know it. Why?

For the United States, Spanish is not a foreign language anymore. With a regular flow of new immigrants from South America, as well as with the extensive growth of a Spanish-speaking population, which is large already, Spanish is rapidly becoming the second-most-used language in the United States in terms of the amount of speakers. According to a Pew Research Center report, an estimated 37.6 million people in the U.S. speak Spanish as their first language; in 2060, analysts predict the United States will have 128.8 million people for whom Spanish is their native language, thus turning the country into the world’s largest Spanish-speaking country (Businessinsider.com). Considering all this, Caucasian, African American, and Asian students (and people of all ages) might want to be able to improve communications with such an enormous group of people; soon enough, it will be a regular situation when in some public places, there will be nine Hispanic people for one-two persons of another skin color.

Being bilingual in a global world is another preference that one might consider when studying Spanish (Huffingtonpost.com). If you have ever traveled to another country, you might have experienced problems with communicating with local population. Since Spanish-speaking countries are among the most popular touristic destinations for U.S citizens, would it not be great to be able to freely explore, say, Peru, Argentina, Brazil, or Spain without running into a language barrier? Besides, consider the possibility of access to one of the world’s richest cultural paradigms, books, movies, and traditions; also, consider career opportunities—for a bilingual person, doors of many prestigious companies are often wide open.

In addition, Spanish is not that difficult of a language to learn. Although many Americans are secretly afraid to try learning a foreign language, it is not that difficult—and Spanish is rather simple, especially in terms of pronunciation and spelling (although grammar might sometimes be a little tricky). But people successfully learn and speak Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, and even Georgian (which is, in fact, one of the world’s most difficult languages). Of all them, Spanish is almost the easiest to learn—in about a year, you can speak it competently (EduSpain.com).

Studying Spanish nowadays is a good choice, especially for U.S. students. The number of Spanish-speaking people in the U.S. is growing, and it is important to maintain communication with the Spanish-speaking community. The Spanish language is widely spoken in many countries of the western world, so it is a solid choice if you want to travel, or to learn other cultures. Also, Spanish is not that difficult of a language to learn—in a year, you will be able to communicate almost fluently if you study each day. Based on all this, it is clear that studying Spanish language for a U.S. student is a perfect choice.

References

Lubin, Gus and Macias, Amanda. “6 Reasons Why Everyone Should Learn Spanish.” Business Insider. Business Insider, Inc, 13 Feb. 2014. Web. 07 May 2015.

Planas, Roque. “17 Reasons Every American Should Learn Spanish.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, n.d. Web. 07 May 2015.

“20 Reasons Why Every American Should Learn Spanish.” EduSpain.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 May 2015.

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